Living, JellyBeans, & Tradition

PRESENT LIVING 
Slowing down, exploring our surroundings, and dedicating time for the things and people we love – three reminders of how to live fully in each moment of every day:

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What the Dying Want Us To Know About Living
by Alexandra Rosas
Purple Clover
 

How often do you find yourself in a hurry? In this article, Rosas shares wisdom she learned from loved ones in their final days. She writes, “They [the dying] want us to focus less on the big picture of building a large body of evidence that proves our accomplishments, and more on the true wonders in our life — the kind where we find unexpected beauty that will be remembered with a wistful smile.” How might you put that wisdom into practice in your life?

Traveling Without Seeing
by Frank Bruni
The New York Times 

In reflecting on a recent trip to Shanghai, Bruni marvels at “how tempting it was to stay put, by how easily a person these days can travel the globe, and travel through life, in a thoroughly customized cocoon.” This article reminds us that life is a dance between cherishing the comforts of home and discovering beauty of the strange and new.  How do you strike that balance?

The Time You Have (In JellyBeans)
by ZeFrank
YouTube

What are you going to do today? Watch this short video and consider how you want to live each moment.

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MODERN TRADITIONS

Bar Mitzvahs Get New Look to Build Faith
by Laurie Goodstein
The New York Times

In religion, how do we reconcile our reverence of traditional ritual with our desire to find meaning that is applicable in our modern lives? This article shares how thirteen Jewish Reform congregations are piloting various make-overs of the b’nai mitzvah. A professor of Jewish education at Hebrew Union College asks: “…what’s the point of getting your 200 or 300 closest friends and family members together and having your kid read a text they don’t understand in a language they don’t understand?” Read more about the movement in today's NY Times article by Laurie Goodstien.

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