Reclaiming the Call, Choosing Solidarity, and Reframing Your Experience

Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, during the Aug. 28, 1963, march on Washington, D.C. WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, during the Aug. 28, 1963, march on Washington, D.C. WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Reclaiming the Call

#ReclaimMLK Seeks to Combat the Sanitizing of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Legacy
By Danielle C. Belton
The Root

What social issues come to mind when you think of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy? How do you think we can best live into that legacy today? In this article, Belton sheds light on the #RecliamMLK campaign that is working to “‘retrieve’ MLK’s ‘prophetic past.” By calling for “a ‘day on’ to fight injustice” and lifting up “King's legacy as a leader dedicated to defending black lives,” this article challenges us to reconsider what our dreams for ourselves and one another are. Consider re-reading or listening to his speeches and ask yourself: How does Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy speak to you and the challenges our society faces today?

 

Reframing Your Experience

Image by Chris Gash via New York Times

Image by Chris Gash via New York Times

Writing Your Way to Happiness
By Tara Parker-Pope
New York Times

Do you enjoy writing? Do you keep a journal for reflection and consider it a spiritual practice? In this article, Parker-Pope reports on new research efforts about the power of writing. By “studying whether the power of writing—and then rewriting—your personal story can lead to behavioral changes and improve happiness,” researchers are opening up new windows into how we can control our own lives through story. The research is “based on the idea that we all have a personal narrative that shapes our view of the world and ourselves. But sometimes our inner voice doesn’t get it completely right.” How might you reframe your experience around an area of challenge in your life, or around your efforts toward a justice issue?

 

Choosing Solidarity

The march in Selma: "Yes I will go," Asheville's Clark Olsen said
By Beth Walton
Citizen-Times

Have you asked family, mentors, and elders about their participation in the American Civil Rights Movement? In this article, Walton tells the story of a Unitarian minister who at the last minute decided to make the trip to Selma, Alabama in March of 1965 when Martin Luther King Jr. called for clergy to march for African-American voting rights. His wife shares, “It wasn't until he retired and started speaking about Civil Rights that he realized the consequence the events had on both his personal life and the historical record.” Rev. Clark Olsen was transformed by his experience standing up to injustice. He offers, "Don't be a silent witness. Whenever you see injustice, speak up, take a stand, be in solidarity, you never know what may be the outcome.” How might you hope to remember your participation in social justice efforts?


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