Atonement, Convergence, Forgiveness

LOOK DEEP

Photo Credit: Cia de Foto

Photo Credit: Cia de Foto

Finding A New Tone for the Day of Atonement
by Dave Joseph
On Being Blog

This blog post explores how the author, Dave Joseph, shifted his perspective on atonement and confession from one full of dread to one that is open and courageously self-reflective. The perspective shift came to him when a participant in one of his workshops shared that dialogue offered a moment of confession. The participant further explained: “Dialogue encourages me to look deep into my heart, to have the courage to speak about what is most meaningful and important to me.” Joseph concludes, “I’m pleased to have found a way to transform my understanding of Yom Kippur into an opportunity for ‘confession,’ reflection, healing, and turning back to the ideals that I have chosen to guide my life. Even though it means that I may have some difficult conversations ahead of me.”


COMING TOGETHER

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

When Holy Days Converge
by Rafi Schwartz
GOOD

This year, Yom Kippur and Eid al-Adha converge on the calendar. Jewish and Muslim people around the world will be honoring the holiest days in their religious calendars at the same time. Activist and community organizations in Israel (and around the world) are taking the convergence of the Holy Days to encourage people to explore dialogue and understanding rather than staying stuck in disrespect and fear. May we all take this moment to consider the ways we can come together across our differences.

Check out these other interesting pieces on the convergence of the Holy Days:
Yom Kippur and Eid al Adha in Jaffa
by Varda Spiegel
The Times of Israel

At Rosh Hashanah and Hajj, bridging two cultures through common roots
by Andrea Hodos and Aziza Hasan
Jewish Journal


FORGIVE, BE FORGIVEN

Photo Credit: ReformJudaism.org

Photo Credit: ReformJudaism.org

Why Are Forgiving and Asking Forgiveness So Difficult?
by David Stanley
ReformJudaism.org

In this blog post, Stanley explores the challenge of forgiveness—both asking for it and offering it. Why are we so plagued by the difficulty of forgiveness? How can we allow ourselves to enter into the long, hard spiritual work of seeking and offering forgiveness in order to cultivate more compassion, joy, and kindness? This Yom Kippur, we encourage you (as Stanley does here) to “Leave behind the ego, heal the world, be kind to yourself, be kind to others, and forgive.”