Healing


'JUST BREATHE'

Photo credit: 'Just Breathe' film

Photo credit: 'Just Breathe' film

Short Film ‘Just Breathe’ Helps Kids Deal with Emotions
Posted by Alicia on Amy Poelher’s Smart Girls

 

As the Associate Editor of Amy Poelher's Smart Girls, Alicia Lutes, writes, the rich inner life that exists inside of our human bodies is not always able to project itself outward into the everyday world. "Quite the opposite: our emotional responses are hard to navigate at any age." And figuring out how to navigate what we are physically feeling can be complicated when you're feeling things like rage, sadness, disgust, and confusion for the first time. What skills can kids use to help them integrate these feelings? This topic is what filmmakers Julie Bayer Salzman and Josh Salzman were interested in exploring with their film titled “Just Breathe.” In the 4-minute video, the duo spoke with several young children about how their emotions affect them and how they deal with them. In addition to opening the space for children to engage in conversation around breathing and emotions, they also show how helpful the practice of mindfulness is in keeping kids emotionally healthy.


HEALING THROUGH MOVEMENT

Photo credit: Robert Sturman

Photo credit: Robert Sturman

Injured veteran who found healing in yoga to teach at HEAL Bflo retreat
by Scott Scanlon
The Buffalo News

Dan Nevins, a 43-year-old retired Army staff sergeant, lost his legs to an improvised explosive device while serving in Iraq 12 years ago. When he returned to the United States, he knew that in order for him to stay mentally healthy he needed to keep active. Whether it was his full-time sales job, raising money for the Wounded Warriors, or his myriad of outdoor physical activities, Dan certainly kept himself busy. However, as he told The Buffalo News: "Yoga was never on the radar. It wasn't for tough guys." But people's perspectives change; two years ago, Dan began a journey across the country, teaching Baptiste yoga to as many as 1,600 students at a time in parks, conference rooms and yoga studios. In Dan's words: “Yoga changes people – saves lives, even." How could a contemplative movement practice change your own perspective on life?


RADICAL HEALING

Photo credit: YES! Magazine

Photo credit: YES! Magazine

The Radical Work of Healing:
Fania and Angela Davis on a New Kind of Civil Rights Activism

by Sarah van Gelder
Yes! Magazine

“Self-care and healing and attention to the body and the spiritual dimension—all of this is now a part of radical social justice struggles.”
 
Angela Davis and her sister Fania are longtime social justice advocates and leaders in the call for criminal justice reform. Angela first emerged as a prominent counter-culture activist and radical leader in the 1960s, with a strong presence in the Civil Rights Movement. Her sister, a former civil rights criminal lawyer, later entered a Ph.D. program in indigenous studies, apprenticing with traditional healers around the globe. Later founding the Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth, today she is calling for a truth and reconciliation process “focused on the historic racial trauma that continues to haunt the United States.” In this conversation with YES! Magazine co-founder Sara van Gelder, Fania says:   “A lot of people think that restorative justice can only address interpersonal harm—and it’s very successful in that. But the truth and reconciliation model is one that’s supposed to address mass harm—to heal the wounds of structural violence.” Click here to read more of the conversation between Angela, Fania and Sarah. 


HEALING THE HEART

Photo credit: askgeorgie.com

Photo credit: askgeorgie.com

Healing Your Sensitive, Broken Heart
by Melissa Mae
Huffpost Women

"Being sensitive can feel like a curse. On the other hand, neither acknowledging nor processing the pain can present predicaments far worse: Becoming one of those hurt people who hurt people." So writes Melissa Mae inthis Huffpost Women blog post about grief, mourning and loss. She challenges the Western practice of being ashamed of grief or trying to process loss in a methodical way. Grief, she writes, is messy and intense. "To heal our sensitive, broken hearts we must marshal the courage to feel it all. That's it. We must honor what comes, observe, and allow ourselves the sacred space to fall apart." What do you think? Does this reflection speak to you or any of the things you have experienced in your own life?